No Bones About It – Gourmet Broth is Sweeping the Nation

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It looks like Grandma really did know best. Over the last ten years, there’s been an awakening to the importance of the old ways where natural health has become a huge part of how we live our lives. Ultimately, it has led to natural living trends and movements, like the local foods movement, farmer’s markets, farm to table eating and even the paleo diet. At the heart of this natural food renaissance has been a man with lofty dreams of sustainable local food sources in every grocery store in America: Chef Gabriel Claycamp.

Claycamp, a chef from some of the best restaurants in the Seattle area, wholeheartedly believes in being a part of the sustainable agriculture locavore movement which involves utilizing the whole animal in our day-to-day lives. Imagine that, nothing goes to waste!

A Sustainable Artisanal Broth Company

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Currently, he has his hands busy with another trend sweeping the nation – bone broth. In fact, Chef Gabriel Claycamp, owner of Cauldron Broths jokes, “It is funny though, this is like our ‘Ancestral Health Inheritance’, this is some old magic.” How right he is! Broth is something we all turn to as a first line of defense when we are beginning to feel under the weather. That slow simmering of bones, herbs and vegetables is just what the body needs to be invigorated with health.

But Claycamp has taken it a step further. His locally sustained business is making artisanal broth using certified organic produce and spices and is using carefully curated grass-fed beef bones, GMO-free certified humane pork bones, certified organic chicken bones, and pastured lamb bones, all from local farms in the state of Washington. In his words, “This is the stuff that culinary dreams are made of.”

 

Chef Gabriel wants to make the most delicious broth you’ve ever tasted. He says that most restaurants use a ratio of 1 pound of bones to yield one gallon of broth, but Cauldron Broths uses five pounds of bones! This will make the broth more rich and as nutritionally complete as possible. He has started a Kickstarter campaign with dreams of producing rich broths in a USDA approved kitchen by early summer in Bellingham, WA. Ideally, he plans on selling his gourmet broths to local grocery stores and restaurants, as well as have the broths made available to local hospitals so patients can have a more natural diet that improves their health. How awesome is that?!

Check out his Kickstarter page and Facebook page and help get the word out about Cauldron Broths. Chef Gabriel and his wonderful wife, Kathy are taking the local sustainable movement by storm and you can be a part of their success. Who knows, maybe a Cauldron Broths storefront will open in your neck of the woods.

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published February 4th, 2016
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  • AnotherLover

    Bellingham sounds nice..

  • Silverbug

    I buy the bones at the market. Put them into a crock pot for 2-4 days on low at night high in day. Or use the carcass from a whole chicken.

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