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Magnesium deficiency symptoms explained: Do you show any of these?

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Vitamins and minerals are essential to good health. They help build tissues and bones, transport and regulate our hormones, allow us to fight off infections and strengthen our immune systems. When we have a vitamin or mineral deficiency, it plays havoc with our bodies and our health. And the mineral magnesium is no exception.

What does magnesium do?

Every organ in your body needs magnesium. It contributes to the formation of your teeth and bones, helps activate essential enzymes, regulates blood calcium levels, aids in the production of energy and regulates other essential nutrients such as zinc, copper, potassium and vitamin D. Our hearts, kidneys and muscles all require magnesium as well.

Foods high in magnesium include nuts, whole grains and green leafy vegetables, but it is difficult to get enough magnesium from dietary sources. Even when you do get enough magnesium from your diet, many things can deplete your body of this essential mineral. These include a viral illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, pancreatitis and kidney disease. Stress, menstrual periods and excessive use of coffee, salt, alcohol and soda can also deplete your magnesium stores.

Magnesium deficiency symptoms explained

A magnesium deficiency can present itself with very specific symptoms. If you are experiencing any of these, a lack of magnesium may be the cause.

Supplementation

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may want to consider taking a quality, high-end form of magnesium. The recommended minimum daily intake is, according to National Institutes of Health Fact Sheet (4), 400 to 420 mg for healthy men over the age of 18, 360 mg for adult women who are still menstruating, and 320 mg for post-menopausal women, although it varies with developmental stages and factors such as pregnancy and lactating. Because the balance of calcium and magnesium in your body can affect your heart, if you are being treated for heart disease, check with your doctor before taking magnesium supplements.


Source:

1) http://science.naturalnews.com [6]

2) http://umm.edu [7]

3) http://www.nytimes.com [8]

4) http://ods.od.nih.gov [9]