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Central Heating Isn’t All Good

Now I’m sure these experts know what they’re talking about but nobody ever seems to mention the downsides of being surrounded by that much heat 24 hours a day.

images-3Morning Dear, it’s funny you asked about central heating last night. Edith and I had just engaged two of the grandchildren in a rather, well, heated exchange about that very thing.

We have radiators all over the house, they can each be controlled by using the valve thing on the side, and then there’s the main control for the system, that’s in the hall. The doctor and the family always drone on that we should have it set higher, we have it set on 5°C which is plenty to make sure that we don’t freeze to death in our beds. Here in the UK the recommendations are that at least one room be kept at a constant temperature of 18°C, and for very old people, like me apparently, 20°C is desirable. Now I’m sure these experts know what they’re talking about but nobody ever seems to mention the downsides of being surrounded by that much heat 24 hours a day.

Now I’m sure these experts know what they’re talking about but nobody ever seems to mention the downsides of being surrounded by that much heat 24 hours a day. The wood burners give us very adequate heat where we need it, and opening the doors allows the heat to move around the house preventing any one area from becoming too hot.

I can’t prove it of course, but when I was in the hospital after my fall everyone, the staff and the patients seemed to constantly have colds. It was so hot, the windows were never open and that total lack of clean fresh air can’t be good for you in my opinion. It’s like inviting germs to hang around, all warm and snug. I had two colds when I was in hospital, two in six weeks, not good at all.

Regardless of the outside temperatures we go out every day. Just up the garden path to the gate to have a look around and get some fresh air in our lungs. We also open some of the windows regularly. The one at the far end of the kitchen is at the back of the house, and the living room one is at the front of the house. Opening those allows air to pass through getting rid of kitchen smells and generally improving the air quality in the house.


We try to make sure everything is closed before visitors arrive because they start to lecture us about keeping warm and abundant (Ed note: ambient) temperatures. We may be getting on a bit, but we are not stupid, or deaf. Why do people speak loudly and slowly to anyone over 70? That bloody nurse is the worst for it.

“H  E  L  L  O   M  A  U  D ,  H  O  W   A  R  E   Y  O  U ?”

I am really confident that having the heating high on day and night is not only expensive but unhealthy. I can understand if there are people who are not able to move around or who have certain medical needs but healthy individuals with a decent diet and a couple of layers of clothes on really don’t need to be breathing in that hot, dry air all the time.

Well, that’s it for now Tess, I’ll speak to you soon.

Regards,



Maud

Resources:

The Prepper’s Cookbook: 300 Recipes to Turn Your Emergency Food into Nutritious, Delicious, Life-Saving Meals

The Prepper’s Blueprint: The Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Through Any Disaster

Surviving a blizzard or winter storm without power

Portable Military Camping Wood Cooking Ice Fishing Cook Stove Tent Heater With Water Kettle Teapot

This article was originally published at Ready Nutrition™ on January 29th, 2015

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