8 Sustainable Changes You Can Make That Will Have a Positive Impact on Earth

It’s a cold, hard fact that Earth’s once plentiful resources are drying up. Climate change, food and water shortages, pollution, deforestation, agriculture changes are all being caused by the wasteful nature of humans. These impacts have directly altered the Earth’s surface faster than the natural process. We are at a tipping point.

One small act can have a far-reaching impact and it all starts with a single step.

Here are some interesting facts to put things into perspective.

  • An average of 230 million tons of trash that is thrown away each year in the United States, and many do not realize that the trash they are throwing away can be reused.
  • Commercial food sources have become corrupted with genetically modified foods, hormones/antibiotics, pesticides and neurotoxins.
  • On average, one household uses 350 gallons of water.
  • Running tap water for two minutes is equal to 3-5 gallons of water.
  • America uses about 15 times more energy per person than the typical developing country.
  • In the United States, more than 40 percent of municipal solid waste is paper — about 71.8 tons a year.
  • Some 4 to 5 trillion plastic bags—including large trash bags, thick shopping bags,and thin grocery bags—were produced globally in 2002. Roughly 80 percent of those bags were used in North America and Western Europe. Every year, Americans reportedly throw away 100 billion plastic grocery bags. (Worldwatch Institute)

The way we live directly impacts our environment and, let’s be honest, humans are very wasteful in regards to using up precious resources. We must begin doing our part to prolong tho negative effects we have on this planet. Earth Day is the perfect time to reflect upon what we can do to live more in tune our planet. In the past, we have suggested ways to make more earth-friendly choices such as recycling, not using chemical cleansers and re-purposing items, but it’s time to take another step forward and begin to live in a more sustainable nature.

8 Sustainable Changes You Can Make That Will Have a Positive Impact on Earth

  1. Buy localFarmers markets are a great way to buy locally and teach your family about sustainability. It is estimated that the average American meal travels about 1,500 miles to get from farm to plate. Our dependency on far away food sources leaves a region vulnerable to supply disruptions, and removes any real accountability of producer to consumer. As well, nutritional value can quickly decline as time passes after harvest. Finding local food sources can circumvent this impending issue and, because locally grown produce is freshest, it is more nutritionally complete. As well, join an organic food co-op to get more good food for less. It’s a great way to start to dip your toes into the self-sovereign movement that is sweeping the US.
  2. Cut the crap out of your diet – GMO and chemically enhanced food is no way to keep your family healthy. This is a big change to make, but will enhance your health in the long run. The easiest way to cut out foods that are full of hormones, antibiotics or considered gmo is to buy organic. A study recently noted that eating organic foods is more healthy than conventional foods. found that organics contain 18 to 69 percent higher concentrations of antioxidants. This means that an organic consumer will ingest the antioxidant equivalent of approximately two extra produce portions every day, without altering food intake. In your new diet, you should also steer clear of artificially colored or flavored food, non-organic milk and meat sources. As well, corn and soy are almost always GMO. Foods containing neurotoxins like MSG, fluoride, or aspartame (along with other artificial sweeteners) should be avoided. By switching to organic and natural foods you are letting all the commercial food sources out there that you object to chemicals being put in your foods. Think of it as a silent protest – and when they can’t get you to buy their product, they’ll take notice and make necessary changes.
  3. Support the bees – Our basic way of life is largely dependent on those little buzzing bees busily collecting food. Bees have been in sharp decline in North America and in parts of Europe over the last several years. Many believe multiple factors are to blame for colony collapses, a few being chemical-based fertilizers, climate change and invasive parasites that attack the hive. This is causing massive amounts of damage to insect-dependent agriculture. As a result, food shortages are on the rise and many experts are quickly trying to find ways to help the bees. Another way to support thriving bees is to follow in the footsteps of Oslo and help create a “bee highway” or feeding stations in urban areas to help feed the bees. “The idea is to create a route through the city with enough feeding stations for the bumblebees all the way,” Tonje Waaktaar Gamst of the Oslo Garden Society told local paper Osloby. ”Enough food will also help the bumblebees withstand man-made environmental stress better.”
  4. Start a garden – America was founded upon an agrarian lifestyle, and farmers were the driving force behind America. Currently, people are trying to find ways to move back to farming in order to grow their own food, to be more self-sufficient and less dependent on the government. In fact, by growing your own food, you cut down on trips to the grocery, thus cutting down on gasoline, carbon emissions and save some money in the process. As well, a lot of attention on yardfarming in suburbia has started becoming very popular in many parts of the United States. Yardfarmers converts unsustainable suburban developments, urban food deserts, or other neglected land into sustainable, more resilient opportunities for people while building community. How great would it be if the yardfarming movement popped up in your neck of the woods? If you can’t wait for the yardfarms, start a community garden. Community gardens encourage an urban community’s food security, allowing people to grow their own food. They bring urban gardeners closer in touch with the source of their food, and break down social isolation by encouraging community interaction.
  5. Sustainable landscaping – 60% of a person’s household water usage goes toward lawn and garden maintenance. During times of drought, our lawn and landscaping can become a bottomless pit where we are throwing away money to keep grass alive. Rather than spending exorbitant amounts of money to maintain landscaping, think outside of the box and choose a more sustainable form of landscaping. As well, consider growing native plants in your area. This will cut down on water usage and encourage native wildlife, insects, etc. to hang out in your yard.
  6. Only use organic fertilizers when gardening – Despite what some corporations want you to believe, chemicals are not good for plants. The application of glyphosate around the world has increased 15 fold since these Roundup Ready crops were first introduced in the 1990s. Roundup Ready crops have created a problem in agriculture that is similar to the problems caused by antibiotics, whose overuse has bred highly resistant strains of superbugs. The overuse of glyphosate has bred superweeds, which are resistant to the pesticide. And the more resistant they become, the more pesticides that farmers have to apply. It’s an endless cycle that farmers have no idea how to break out of. Composting organic material for the soil is a healthier alternative. With composting, you are utilizing aerobic and anaerobic decomposition processes to break down the compostable material and invite beneficial organisms to assist in the process. The end result is a full spectrum soil conditioner that has many benefits.
  • Compost contains macro and micronutrients often absent in synthetic fertilizers.
  • Compost releases nutrients slowly—over months or years, unlike synthetic fertilizers
  • Compost enriched soil retains fertilizers better. Less fertilizer runs off to pollute waterways.
  • Compost buffers the soil, neutralizing both acid & alkaline soils, bringing pH levels to the optimum range for nutrient availability to plants.
  • A compost tea can also be used as a foliar spray on the plant or poured into the soil.
  1. Some natural fertilizers can be found in your garbage and can be composted and turned into natural garden amendments. Banana peels, egg shells, coffee grounds are great for the garden! You can feed the soil with some of these soil amenders, as well: earthworm castingsphosphatepowdered oyster shell, and green sand.

7. Water conservation – Did you know that if a household started conserving water, you can reduce your in-home water use by 35%? This means the average household, which uses 130,000 gallons per year, could save 44,000 gallons of water per year. Learning ways to practice the art of conserving water now, will help you make the most of your water sources. Here are 22 ways to start!

8. Use less packaging – We are all guilty of using zip-loc bags and throwing them away after each use. It’s so wasteful! Luckily, there are lots of alternatives available to us. Some favorites are these paper sandwich baggies or this re-useable velcro sandwich bag. Both will reduce that dreaded carbon footprint. As well, purchasing re-usable lunch containers like these eco-friendly stainless steel containers are great alternatives to plastic. There are some foods like potatoes and oranges that come in their own mesh packaging and knowing how to reuse packaging can simplify your life. In addition, purchase grocery bags that can be reused. This will cut down on having an excess of plastic bags.

Find Alternative Uses For Some of Your Trash

Some of the trash we collect can serve other purposes, and changing your mindset is also an essential sustainability skill. Learning the art of using what you have around you to live is the core of being self-reliant – and what many of us are trying to achieve. Here are 50 of the most common items thrown away and ways you can reuse them. Creativity and resourcefulness can go a long way if we need to rely on what we have around us.

Whether you want to believe it or not, our current way of living is not sustainable. We over consume are wasteful and there is a better, more sustainable way to life. We can’t keep going on like this and if each of us where to make some minor changes to how we live, the earth would already be a better place to live. Let’s make Earth a better place!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published April 22nd, 2017
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  • vocalpatriot

    ugh, more communistic “earth day” crap. Keep it Komrad I’m American.

    • Tess

      Hey Vocal Patriot,

      Gee, I didn’t realize that starting your own garden and using livestock manure for fertilizer was considered communistic. Thanks for schooling me on that! Here is where I’m coming from. Yes, the article is generalized in the sense that if we all make some changes, then we can make a difference, but as a prepper, I’m surprised you see no relevance in the “earth crap” you mentioned.

      Sustainability practices are a valid concern for those who are trying to prepare for harder times. Have you heard of the term, “Use it up wear it out make it do or do without”? My grandmother, who went through the Great Depression, has shared many stories of how her family dealt with food shortages, had to purify their own water, reuse their hand-me-downs and find new purposes for what they had, and she passed it on to me…

      I don’t know where your preparedness efforts lie, but mine are to prepare for a long-term economic disaster. In order to prepare for that type of disaster, you have to understand that you won’t be able to go to your friendly grocery store and buy a week’s worth of food (that’s that garden thing I was mentioning above). As well, you will want a way to keep your garden thriving (i.e. natural fertilizers and bees).

      Hello! Sustainability. So, whether you believe in practicing it on a day-to-day basis like I do, or choose to use it as a training exercise for prepping, it still has it’s use. I try to show readers the importance of looking outside of the box with their preps and applications. I do hope that in the future you will come back to Ready Nutrition and see what I mean. Furthermore, if you think you are going to a lone wolf and ride out the apocalypse, you may be in for a surprise, my comrad. Community sustainability is a very important aspect of a prepared community, so buying local produce and knowing where you can source items around you is paramount.

      Since you truly have no idea what it means to ration and find multiple uses for your preps, here are some articles that you may find helpful. Warning – it’s about sustainability, so I hope you can handle it.

      http://readynutrition.com/r

      http://readynutrition.com/r

      http://readynutrition.com/r

      http://readynutrition.com/r

      http://readynutrition.com/r

      Now, I hope you see that there are many aspects to sustainability, and in my hunble opinion, they go hand in hand. Ingenuity, out of the box thinking and knowing how to reuse what you have in a disaster could set you apart from everyone else. That’s just my two cents.

  • Freedom Woman

    And so you see the problem with the response from the so called vacalpatriot. Probably most of your subscribers voted for the Pres. and Congress that have, in the last 100 days, approved the Keystone XL which will run through the watershed for millions of people, approved the Dakota Access Pipeline, which will run under a river, decimated the EPA, voted and signed to allow coal companies to once again dump mountain top removal waste into our streams, all to prop up the dying coal industry, and on and on.
    So we can and should do our little things you are suggesting, but lets not kid ourselves, in the name of being “Americans” we are killing our planet and ourselves. God have mercy on our children.

    • Tess

      Hey Vocal Patriot,

      Gee, I didn’t realize that starting your own garden and using livestock manure for fertilizer was considered communistic. Thanks for schooling me on that! Here is where I’m coming from. Yes, the article is generalized in the sense that if we all make some changes, then we can make a difference, but as a prepper, I’m surprised you see no relevance in the “earth crap” you mentioned.

      Sustainability practices are a valid concern for those who are trying to prepare for harder times. Have you heard of the term, “Use it up wear it out make it do or do without”? My grandmother, who went through the Great Depression, has shared many stories of how her family dealt with food shortages, had to purify their own water, reuse their hand-me-downs and find new purposes for what they had, and she passed it on to me…

      I don’t know where your preparedness efforts lie, but mine are to prepare for a long-term economic disaster. In order to prepare for that type of disaster, you have to understand that you won’t be able to go to your friendly grocery store and buy a week’s worth of food (that’s that garden thing I was mentioning above). As well, you will want a way to keep your garden thriving (i.e. natural fertilizers and bees).

      Hello! Sustainability. So, whether you believe in practicing it on a day-to-day basis like I do, or choose to use it as a training exercise for prepping, it still has it’s use. I try to show readers the importance of looking outside of the box with their preps and applications. I do hope that in the future you will come back to Ready Nutrition and see what I mean. Furthermore, if you think you are going to a lone wolf and ride out the apocalypse, you may be in for a surprise, my comrad. Community sustainability is a very important aspect of a prepared community, so buying local produce and knowing where you can source items around you is paramount.

      Since you truly have no idea what it means to ration and find multiple uses for your preps, here are some articles that you may find helpful. Warning – it’s about sustainability, so I hope you can handle it.

      http://readynutrition.com/resources/7-kitchen-essentials-that-deserve-to-be-on-your-preparedness-shelves_15032012/

      http://readynutrition.com/resources/11-emergency-food-items-that-can-last-a-lifetime_20082013/

      http://readynutrition.com/resources/diy-vermicomposting-the-most-efficient-way-of-using-organic-material_14112015/

      http://readynutrition.com/resources/how-harvesting-snow-creates-a-long-term-water-supply_28032017/

      http://readynutrition.com/resources/the-prepared-home-5-prepper-projects-to-start-in-the-spring_22032017/

      Now, I hope you see that sustainability and disaster can go hand in hand. Ingenuity, out of the box thinking and knowing how to reuse what you have in a
      disaster could set you apart from everyone else. That’s just my two cents.

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